2013 is Proclaimed the “Year of the Bird”

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2013 is Proclaimed the “Year of the Bird”

 

As 2013 dawns, news also arrives. Whether it be good, bad or ‘ugly,’ there are many organizations – most especially the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Department – that are already raising awareness and moving extra focus on the world of migratory birds; the hunting of, preserving of habitats, and the prevention of various industries from placing even more of the species on the endangered list in the year to come.

 

As always, it is the group of hunters and anglers that have shown the most interest when it comes to this subject, and are not only giving their funds but also their time and hard work in order to bring the treatment of migratory birds back into the forefront of peoples’ minds.

 

Recently, an independent oil and gas exploration company was fined $22,500 after migratory birds died in pits used to store toxic oil drilling waste, which violated the Migratory Bird Treaty Act in Montana, Wyoming and Nebraska. And that was just in December 2012, so the problems still exist and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Department is doing all they can in order to make 2013 end on a much higher note.

 

In fact, this January, through press releases as well as new rules and regulations that will be brought out to the public, 2013 is being declared the, ‘Year of the Bird.’ Literally, it is the world of migratory birds that is facing some serious issues when it comes to the EPA. Even a brand new campaign for Woodsy the Owl (the American icon that was established and utilized for the environmental conservation movement), may be scheduled.

 

Woodsy was always used to bring the next generation into the world of environmental protection, and has always been a way A female and male mallard duck couple prepare to land on a riverto inspire parents and teachers to help their children care about the world around them. And with these observations and explorations, it is the goal to get children AND adults to remember that birds face truly difficult challenges in this ‘industrial’ world and to save them, we all must take an active role in their survival. Not only that, but we must all get cracking when it comes to caring for our land through recycling, reducing waste, finding and developing better and more wise ways to use our natural resources, while using the skill and expertise of the hunting and fishing community to help with habitat rebuilding and preservation.

 

The Migratory Bird Program has always been a true ‘team-like’ community. Not only do a variety of individuals and businesses work to manage various bird populations and their habitats, but they also increase awareness and respect for the value of migratory birds by improving bird hunting, bird watching, and other outdoor experiences.

 

Just recently, it was the Avian Power Line Interaction Committee (APLIC) that released a completely updated, state-of-the-art guidance document regarding: Reducing Avian Collisions with Power Lines. Originally published back in 1994, the new document has identified all the best practices and specific guidance used to help businesses – from electric utility companies to wildlife power administrations, agencies, and other stakeholders – on how to reduce bird collisions with power lines.

 

Any migratory bird hunter will be the first to say that the migratory bird community holds some of the most magnificent resources. Not only do a variety of species play a role in the environment, but they also help the economy – both at home and abroad. The mission of the Fish and Wildlife Service’s Migratory Bird Program is not only to conserve these migratory bird populations and their habitats for future generations, but through careful monitoring, effective management, and support given to and received from national and international partnerships, habitats for migratory birds as well as other wildlife can be preserved.

 

As always when it comes to the Fish and Wildlife Service Programs that are created in order to benefit our conservation efforts, the success of managing and conserving migratory birds in the United States depends on close/vital partnerships with Federal and State agencies, tribes, and even private communities and organizations. Hence, why more and more hunters and individual organizations are jumping on board in order to do what’s best and make this – “Year of the Bird” – beneficial to everyone. (http://www.fws.gov/)

 

More and more bird activities will be brought about in 2013, as the responsibilities and projects of federal agencies are announced. For migratory game birds, such as ducks and doves, everything from monitoring harvest to ensuring that the hunting regulations put in place are appropriate for the current status of those species, will be looked at.

 

From the hunting of  waterfowl (ducks, geese, etc.), doves, American woodcock, sandhill crane, and other webless species, this “Year of the Bird” will be on everyone’s list of things ‘to watch’ as 2013 moves forward – with even more being looked at as we near the beginning of the hunting season.

 

The hunting of migratory birds be ‘headline news’ for 2013, so that the hunting ‘experience’ can be better and richer throughout the season.

 

www.SportsmansLife.com

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