The Other Woman’s House

Filed under Books, The Literary Nook

Taking place in England in a small village called, Little Holling, Catriona Bowskill (Connie), and her husband Christian (Kit), live in Melrose Cottage. They run their own business called, Nulli Secundus Ltd. (which means: Second to None). They are data management consultants, and live near Connie’s family who spend their time running a store where Connie does part-time bookkeeping. Just one big happy family…you think? Considering this is a true psychological suspense novel, don’t bet on it.

From the beginning, readers experience the fact that Connie has a slight issue. One night, unable to get to sleep, she goes to her computer and enters a real estate website to take a virtual tour of a house in Cambridge. This particular house has been an obsession of hers for a long time, but she’s not able to discuss her feelings about it with anyone else, including her husband. As her ‘fingers’ do the walking through the house, she enters the lounge in virtual world and there, lying face down in a pool of her own blood, is a woman. Connie rushes to tell her husband and have him look at this horrible picture. But when Kit arrives, the picture of the woman is gone and everything is very pristine. From this moment on, Connie tells everyone who will listen to her about this sight, yet when any of them – including the police – look at the site, not to mention visit the house in person, they find nothing and insist it’s all in Connie’s head.

At first, it is odd when the reader sees that all of Connie’s family members are incredibly mean to her, and have no love for Kit. The policeman covering the case has just gotten married and he and his wife are always at each other’s throats. And, topping it all off, Kit seems to be doing all he can to push his wife over the edge by constantly putting her down. It seems that there’s no one in this story that’s happy. But, no worries, all will be explained.

This author’s descriptive writing truly deserves acclaim, although sometimes the intense bitterness of the characters detract from the actual mystery that readers want to get to. Stay with it, because all anger aside – THIS is a true work of suspenseful art.

 

Until Next Time, Everybody,

Amy

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