Google+

NPR: Perspectives on Marijuana Legalization

What If Marijuana Were Legal? Possible Outcomes

by John Burnett

All Things Considered, April 20, 2009 · There’s a surge of public interest in legalizing marijuana as a partial answer to a host of problems. Last week, Mexico’s congress debated legalizing cannabis as a way to undermine cartel income. And when President Obama held his online town hall last month, he was swamped with the question: Why not legalize pot as a way to help the economy?

NPR came up with a hypothetical scenario and asked experts to play along, commenting on their imagined outcomes. The scenario: Marijuana has been legal for two years throughout the U.S. It is treated, in the eyes of the law, similar to alcohol. It is taxed and regulated, and users must be 21 or older. Pot smokers can buy it by the gram at licensed dispensaries. Predictably, the law change would make some people very happy — and others deeply concerned.

Imagine if you turned on the radio and heard this: “From NPR News in Washington, I’m Carl Kasell. After 70 years of prohibition, marijuana becomes legal today for personal consumption throughout the United States for persons 21 and older …”  How high will the rehab rate be from those with believe they are addicted,  For More info on Frequently asked questions.

Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images

How would the world change if cannabis finally came out of the closet, if it were fully legal to possess, sell and cultivate?

Willie Nelson, the 76-year-old iconic balladeer and cannabis connoisseur, says there are pros and cons.

“We don’t worry about going to jail anymore for smoking it,” he says. But, “a lot of our old friends who dealt it are out of work.”

In Austin, Texas, the legal cannabis created a surge in business at head shops such as Oat Willie’s.

“There’s the most popular one, the Volcano,” says Doug Brown, the store’s longtime general manager, pointing to a conical device that is supposed to provide a milder smoking experience. “It’s very expensive — $575 — and they’re hard to get hold of.”

In the two years since legalization, Brown has noticed new customers, many of whom are older.

“More affluent people, more fun people — people that have never done it before, but have decided to try it since it’s now legalized,” he says.

One of the new marijuana epicures is Sarah Bird, a middle-aged novelist in Austin and columnist for Texas Monthly Magazine. She says she hadn’t smoked marijuana much since her college days.

“It’s been a godsend for the temperamentally tense such as myself,” Bird says. “And it’s really been a boon to getting me off my addiction to Ambien and Yellowtail Merlot.”

“What’s not to like?” Bird asks. It’s low-calorie, she doesn’t wake up hung over, it’s great for the libido, and it’s popular at dinner parties, baked into Belgian chocolate brownies.

But most of all, she adds: “You know you’re not contributing to the Sinaloa Cartel and you’re not destabilizing Mexico. And in my case, as a parent, I’m not modeling criminal behavior for my child.”

Recreational And Medicinal Uses

At the University of Texas at Austin, Kevin Prince, coordinator of UT’s alcohol and drug program, says he’s seen a spike in pot smoking since it became legal. This is troubling to him because national studies show that sustained marijuana use directly affects academic achievement.

“One of the main issues is there’s still a mystique when it comes to marijuana use,” Prince says. “A lot of people still don’t know that marijuana use is addictive. If you’re spending more time smoking weed than going to class or going to work, that’s a problem.”

Not everyone uses it recreationally. The end of cannabis prohibition has been a blessing for Marsha, a medical marijuana user with multiple sclerosis. Sitting in a wheelchair in a friend’s backyard in Houston, Marsha says she smokes weed to “escape from my body” and the chronic pain caused by nerve damage.

“Oh, what a relief it is not to be home alone wondering if this minor-league marijuana user, if the cops were gonna come bust me down,” she says. “It’s nice to feel free.”

The Cartels Stay Strong

Free at last to smoke marijuana: Since the prohibition on cannabis ended, has it delivered the results its supporters claimed it would?

With the spiraling drug mayhem in Mexico, some Latin American leaders looked at legalizing marijuana as a way to deny the murderous cartels a portion of their profits. When it was banned, marijuana was the greatest source of income for Mexican traffickers. Now that it’s cultivated domestically and sold legally, surely that has crippled the cartels?

“These are crooks. You’re not gonna take ’em out of the criminal activity business,” says Robert Almonte, who worked narcotics for 25 years with the El Paso Police Department, just across the river from the ruthless Juarez Cartel. “Because drugs are legalized, they’re not gonna say, ‘Let’s go back to school and get an honest job.’ ”

Almonte, director of the Texas Narcotic Officer’s Association, says all cannabis legalization has done is force the drug mafias to improvise.

“As far as marijuana is concerned, they have been selling it less expensive than what it can sell for here in the United States,” Almonte says. “But more importantly, we’re seeing a more potent marijuana. And with that we’re seeing … an increase in the emergency room admissions.”

A similar observation comes from William Martin, a drug policy expert and senior fellow at the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University in Houston.

“Just as after the repeal of prohibition, organized crime got into many other kinds of activities — protection money, control of the laundry business — so the drug cartels are quite flexible,” Martin says. “They’ve diversified into kidnapping, human trafficking, protection other crime. And they’re still selling cocaine, heroin and meth, which are highly profitable. So unfortunately, it has not hurt them as much as we’d hoped.”

Fewer Criminal Cases, Records

Supporters of legalization say one of the undeniable benefits has been the reduction in criminal cases that have clogged courts.

“I used to represent a lot of marijuana smokers and dope dealers,” says Gerry Goldstein, a prominent criminal defense lawyer in San Antonio.

Though he is not billing as many hourly fees these days, he believes that’s a good thing for the criminal justice system.

“Back in … 2006 to 2008, 45 percent of all drug arrests in this country for the most part were marijuana offenses,” Goldstein says. “That’s a staggering waste of resources of our law enforcement.”

And it left young people scarred with criminal records for something that is arguably less dangerous than alcohol, Bill Martin says.

“If they were convicted, they could lose employment, child custody, student aid, voting privileges, some welfare benefits. They could even forfeit assets like cars or houses. The new regime has eliminated that. Problem users are now being treated as a public health matter and not as a criminal issue, and that’s appropriate,” he says.

It Wouldn’t Fill Government Coffers

Since marijuana became legal, farmers around the country — illicit and formerly illicit — have scrambled to put Cannabis sativa seeds into the ground. Under the law, they pay $1,000 for a state license, whether their crop is hydroponic or soil-grown.

“The marijuana crop’s been going really good. … Just wait till the last frost, just start puttin’ the plants in the ground, and add a little nitrogen fertilizer to give you a lotta leaf, and after that it just grows like a weed, which is what it is,” says Larry Butler. He stands among the crop rows at his Boggy Creek Farm, a 5-acre certified organic urban farm in Austin, Texas.

His wife, Carol Ann Sayle, says they’ve been a bit disappointed by their newest cash crop and are nervous about losing the farm’s family ambiance.

“The retailer takes a big hit off the bong, so to speak, and then the government comes in with their taxes,” Sayle says. “So what’s left for the farmer? After all that work and … trying to ease peoples’ fears that we’re gonna be giving it to children. So, what’s left for the farmer? Stems and seeds is about all that’s left.”

Jeffrey Miron, a Harvard economist who has modeled and written on the economics of the marijuana market, figures state and federal taxes on cannabis sales add up to $6.7 billion annually.

And he calculates the savings from not having to enforce state and federal marijuana laws — in arrests, prosecution and incarceration — at $12.9 billion a year. Excluding additional expenses, such as the public health cost of marijuana, or the cost of administering the new law, Miron figures that legal pot creates almost a $20 billion bonus. Miron adds, however, that the people who thought the taxation of marijuana would create a windfall for government coffers will be disappointed.

“Compared to the size of most federal government agencies, compared to the tax revenue from things like alcohol and tobacco, and certainly compared to the size of deficits that we have, this is just not a major issue, it is not a panacea, it is not curing any of our significant ills,” he says. “There may be good reasons to do it, but the budgetary part is not a crucial reason to do it.”

There Are More People Smoking It

Now that marijuana is legal to possess, use, process, transfer, transport, retail, wholesale and cultivate, has the United States become a nation of potheads?

The Dutch experiment offers an interesting case study. After marijuana was decriminalized there in 1976, pot smoking didn’t jump in Holland, and it remained well below U.S. levels. But it rose sharply after coffee shops opened in the 1980s and began openly selling cannabis. The U.S. already has a huge appetite for drugs: It’s the largest illegal narcotics market in the world. Half of all high-school seniors have used pot.

Drug policy analysts interviewed for this report believe that now that marijuana is legal and socially acceptable in the U.S., there are more people smoking it. And some of them are kids.

“They’ll start using it sooner now because it looks like it’s more OK, seems less harmful, because they see their parents doing it,” says Rosalie Pacula, co-director of the Drug Policy Research Center at the RAND Corp. “Do we know how to keep kids from drinking alcohol? No, we don’t. So why would we expect we’d be any better at it with marijuana?”

And the reason we should care is because of the effect that marijuana can have on the development of adolescent brains, says Dr. Vicki Nejtek, a psychiatrist who works on drug abuse at the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth.

“We know that marijuana use and chronic use, as it is now, in an adolescent population can cause extreme developmental delay,” Nejtek says. “We know the myelin sheath around our brain cells acts like an insulator to an electric cord. When that’s stripped away, it can cause memory loss, it reduces our ability to concentrate, and a reduction in brain cell activity.”

In 2007, 14.4 million Americans ages 12 and older admitted to survey-takers that they had used pot in the past month. Rice University’s Bill Martin believes, now that it’s legal, about one-third more people are using marijuana — maybe 19 million Americans. Martin believes legal pot — which is, after all, an intoxicant — has been good for society but bad for young people.

“I have nine grandchildren,” he says. “I would prefer that none of them use marijuana to any significant extent. I have seen students, I’ve seen friends, become less interesting.”

NPR’s fictitious scenario of legalized marijuana is not likely to come true anytime soon. Most states are still fighting to legalize medical marijuana and decriminalize marijuana penalties, much less seriously considering legalization. President Obama is on record opposing legalizing pot as a way to boost the economy. For now, whether legal cannabis would cause an outbreak of reefer madness or make more people just mellow out, makes for an interesting parlor game. But it’s only a pipe dream.

******************************


Commentary: Puff, Puff, Keep Drug Laws Passed

iStockphoto.com

iStockphoto.com

NPR.org, April 20, 2009 · As a 35-year law enforcement veteran and a father of two, I am alarmed by the dramatic increase in efforts to legalize or decriminalize powerful and dangerous drugs, including marijuana.

I am surprised that the “drug war has failed” drumbeat of drug legalizers is growing louder even in the wake of recent significant declines in drug abuse by young Americans. And I am appalled at the suggestion by some that legalizing and taxing marijuana is a smart way to close government budget gaps.

I have yet to hear a convincing argument that marijuana legalization is a healthy policy choice — physiologically, economically or socially.

Legalization advocates claim that current drug policy has failed. This is patently false if you measure success by whether drug use has increased or decreased. In fact, according to the Monitoring the Future survey conducted by the University of Michigan, youth marijuana use has declined by 25 percent since 2001. That translates into hundreds of thousands fewer young people using drugs today than just eight years ago.

That is not a failure of policy — it is a success generated by a balanced policy focused on preventing use, enforcing laws and treating those afflicted with the disease of addiction.

Legalization advocates would have us believe that marijuana is a benign drug. That message is not only reckless, it is dangerous. By treating marijuana as a joke, the pro-legalization lobby is using our kids as pawns in a dangerous political game. The research is clear: Because teen brains are still developing, young people who use marijuana are at greater risk of developing dependence.

Research also shows that marijuana use leads to greater incidence of depression, attention deficit disorder, and even schizophrenia. According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, chronic marijuana use is associated with problem behaviors, including other drug use.

According to Dr. Paula Riggs, associate professor of psychiatry and director of adolescent services at the University of Denver, marijuana use by teens causes acute neurotoxicity. It “impairs cognitive functioning … And if you’re a kid who smokes regularly, you won’t progress developmentally at the same rate as kids who aren’t smoking.”

Today’s marijuana is much more powerful and addictive than in years past. THC — the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana — now averages 10 percent, up from 4 percent since 1983, and many samples tested between 20 percent and 37 percent. If that does not convince you, consider that marijuana is the No. 1 drug for which Americans kids between the ages of 12 and 18 seek treatment.

More than 65 percent of all teens in treatment are there for marijuana dependence, with another 11 percent in treatment for alcohol and drug dependence together, many of whom are using pot with alcohol. In another disturbing trend, hospital emergency room admissions involving marijuana tripled between 1994 and 2002 and now surpass ER admissions involving heroin. And drugged driving accidents — many involving marijuana — kill more than 8,000 and maim another 500,000 every year.

The bottom line is that efforts to legalize drugs including marijuana, and attempts to change America’s abstinence-based drug policy to one of harm reduction — in other words, a policy where we teach people to use harmful drugs safely — put our kids and our communities at risk.

The Monitoring the Future survey shows that the No. 1 reason kids cite for not using pot is that it is illegal. Ask almost any cop, paramedic, ER doctor or schoolteacher if they think legalization is a good idea, and you will hear a resounding “no”. It is clear that drug use and the disease of addiction threaten America’s health and economic stability. It is amazing that some would suggest unleashing even more destruction and addiction through legalization.

Entertainment

Top Ten DVD List for June 20, 2017

  This Week’s DVD Releases by Kam Williams Top Ten DVD List for June 20, 2017     Life https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B06XT9C1C9/ref%3dnosim/thslfofire-20 Car Wash https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B06XHGM6SZ/ref%3dnosim/thslfofire-20 Merlin https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B071DVMV36/ref%3dnosim/thslfofire-20 The Paul Naschy Collection [Vengeance of the Zombies / Horror Rises from the Tomb/ Blue Eyes … [Read More its Good for You.....]

Books

Gil’s Goodwill!

  Gil Robertson The “Book of Black Heroes” Interview with Kam Williams Gil's Goodwill! For nearly three decades, writer/author Gil L. Robertson, IV has used the written word to enlighten, empower and uplift. The one-time political organizer initially made his mark in entertainment journalism, penning over 50 national magazine covers and contributing bylines to a wide range of publications that include the Los Angeles Times, the Atlanta … [Read More its Good for You...]

Art

The Day After the Day Of

  The Day After the Day Of by Paul Ilechko   The sky sheds its tears. This morning is the morning of the day after. The day of mourning, the day after the day of.  I beseech the sky to shed tears in order to wash away the tears on my face.   This is the first day of the time after. This is the beginning of a new time, the days of pain, the days of sorrow. We are in mourning. The sky looks down and sheds its tears for … [Read More its Good For You...]

Real Estate

How to Hire a Winner in Real Estate

  How to Hire a Winner in Real Estate by Amy Lignor   You want to buy that new house because the twins are on their way. Little Betty and Little John are already there, but who knew you would have even more so soon? What’s that? Oh…well, of course, in order to buy that new home with four bedrooms instead of two, you will also need to sell your present homestead in order to get the money needed to start paying on a new one. And, of … [Read More its Good for You.....]

Lifestyle

Ejogo’s Largo!

    Carmen Ejogo The “It Comes at Night” Interview with Kam Williams Ejogo's Largo! Carmen Ejogo has established a distinguished career in both feature films and television. She is best known thus far for her leading role of civil rights activist ‘Coretta Scott King’ opposite David Oyelowo in Ava DuVernay's universally acclaimed SELMA as well as being singled out for her ‘mind-blowing’ lead role as Sister in SPARKLE alongside … [Read More its Good for You...]

Outdoors

10 Tips for Taking Your Kids Fishing for the First Time

  10 Tips for Taking Your Kids Fishing for the First Time by Iowa DNR Whether it’s a passion you’re hoping to pass down to the next generation, or just an idea to get the family out of the house for an afternoon, a fishing trip with your kids can be the stuff memories made of. Keep the experience fun and positive with these handy tips: Make it fun. The first thing to remember – adults and kids alike – is that this trip is not about catching … [Read More its Good for You...]

Sports

You Don’t Have to be Greek to be a “Zorba” Fanatic

  You Don’t Have to be Greek to be a “Zorba” Fanatic by Amy Lignor   No, the sport is not called ‘Zorba’, but it most definitely fits for this article’s title. This most unusual sport is actually called ‘Zorbing’, and has caught on like wildfire across the globe. And now, seeing as that the NBA has wrapped, with Golden State proving that they were determined to make amends for last season; and with the NHL closing up shop for the season … [Read More its Good for You...]

Business

Add Value with Summer Home Renovation Projects

  Add Value with Summer Home Renovation Projects by Amy Lignor   There are a whole list of summer activities for you and the kids planned. Most of them, of course, you want to be nothing but fun, such as grilling outside on the patio or swimming in the pool. However, having the backyard pool and patio are two things you really need in place before either of those activities could be enjoyed. And building this area could be a great … [Read More its Good for You...]

Travel

Adventure Trips That “Erupt” with Excitement

  Adventure Trips That “Erupt” with Excitement by Amy Lignor   This is one of those articles for that ‘Indiana Jones’ breed out there who wants nothing but excitement, adventure and a bit of living-on-the-edge when it comes to where they wish to spend their summer vacation. Yes, there are those groups of travelers out there that find nothing cooler than heading to the hottest places in the world that could literally erupt at any … [Read More its Good for You...]

Green Living

Creating the Perfect Vegetable Garden

  Creating the Perfect Vegetable Garden by Amy Lignor   Many are still dealing with that wintery mix Mother Nature just loves to toss down from the sky this time of year. Yet, that gardener living inside the soul – the one just dreaming of the sunny skies and lazy rainy days that are must-haves in order to grow the best vegetables possible – is already jotting down the facts, tricks and tips they need to know in order to make that … [Read More its Good for You...]